Full-Sized Hot Rod: The Kimber 4-inch K6s Target

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Kimber K6s Target 4

With excellent lines and accuracy to boot, Kimber’s new 4-inch K6s Target has speed and performance worth bragging about.

What The K6s Target Brings To The Table:

  • Despite boasting a 4-inch barrel, the revolver comes in at a very manageable 25.5 ounces unloaded.
  • A slab-sided cylinder keeps the gun's width at 1.39-inches.
  • A fully-adjustable target rear sight allows shooters to dial in the handgun.
  • Dovetailed in, the rear sight can be swapped for Kimber's low-rise combat sight.
  • All stainless steel, the gun proves quite fetching.

Concealed carry calls the handgun market’s tune. So (a surprise to no one), when Kimber jumped into the revolver game four years ago, that’s exactly what it blueprinted and milled out. The K6s, in its original iterations (all eight of them the first couple of years), wasn’t good for much more … unless the Marquis de Sade in you revels banging away with a double-action-only knuckle-buster.

Yet, Kimber’s snubbies struck a chord, offering something a bit different than what pocket gun aficionados have seen in a spell: style, effectiveness and, above all, cold, hard steel.

The company also served up something else—the perfect platform to mature an entire revolver line. For all intents and purposes, that happened this year.

Creeping along, Kimber has grown the K6s line in number and stature, culminating in the company’s first full-sized wheelgun. But, don’t turn a jaundiced eye toward the 4-inch DASA Target as just another clone of the K-frame archetype. Whereas those .357 Magnums are the “muscle cars” of revolver-dom, Kimber’s big wheelie is a “roadster”; agile, quick and, yes, dashing. What’s more, it’s something to brag about.

Built for Speed … Among Other Things

Knock or compliment, early K6s iterations were notable hefty revolvers. A stainless steel frame, cylinder and barrel endow this attribute, but less so as the K6s has grown in size. Through the addition of a hammer and longer barrels, the frame and six-round cylinder have remained essentially the same. In turn, the revolver has grown bigger; but, relative to the rest of its class, the K6s Target is comparably small.

Unique barrel geometry simultaneously keeps the target slim and the weight of the gun forward.
Unique barrel geometry simultaneously keeps the target slim and the weight of the gun forward.

Don’t take my word for it; measure it up against similar makes and models—say, the Smith & Wesson Model 19 and Colt Python. Booking at 25.5 ounces, the 4-inch Target is a full 12 ounces lighter than the Model 19. The Python is a full pound less. That’s substantial and quite a bit less burdensome on the hip. Add on that it’s also slimmer (1.39-inch width) and shorter (5.25-inch height), and this is a revolver that’s got the edge in a number of ways. Not only does it prove much more nimble—an advantage in a match for certain—but it’s also a better candidate for an on-person defense option.
Concealed carry? Is he serious? Quite, and so is Kimber.

It’s evident, with the gunmaker smoothing every sharp edge to remove any snag point and flatten the surfaces that keep it pressed tightly to your profile. Need more proof? Well, the Target was released in tandem with the K6s Combat, an optimized defensive model with low-rise sights and finger groove grips. Either, however, is more than up to the job as a carry piece—and not just outside the waistband, if you know how to do it right.


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Going big, or at least larger, is an advantage pistol-makers figured out awhile ago. Many in the ubiquitous striker-fired market reined back their subcompact catalog, emphasizing their 4- and 4.5-inch compact models. It’s not a ton more gun to tote, and its benefits are legion. A longer sight radius, less muzzle rise and better accuracy all make sense in that light—a similar ethos that the K6s brings to the revolver game.

Barrel, Cylinder … And Plenty of Them

Nevertheless, not everything about the 4-inch K6s is slight. The gun has both a substantial barrel and cylinder; yet, through some clever geometry, Kimber has kept both slender and manageable.

First, the barrel. It’s a single piece of stainless steel shaped like an inverse teardrop. The narrow bottom runs the length of the bore, creating a shroud for the ejector rod at its aft. At once, this design puts more material desirably toward the muzzle, thereby giving the gun leverage against muzzle rise. At the same tick, the profile remains trim enough to practically disappear on your person. As an added benefit, the barrel makes for an exceedingly smooth draw and re-holster—cutting like a knife in and out of your hanger.

 The gun’s push-button cylinder release is quick and intuitive. Also note the flat sides of the cylinder: They keep the K6s slim yet give it some heft. The ejection rod isn’t full length, pushing .357 cartridges out about three-quarters of the way (bone up on your stress reloads!).

The gun’s push-button cylinder release is quick and intuitive. Also note the flat sides of the cylinder: They keep the K6s slim yet give it some heft. The ejection rod isn’t full length, pushing .357 cartridges out about three-quarters of the way (bone up on your stress reloads!).

The cylinder is equally an oxymoron. A matter of physics, it’s as beefy as any other .357 Magnums, yet it cuts a leaner contour, thanks to how Kimber removes material. Fluting is out; slab-siding the cylinder is the order of the day. It’s an ingenious system.

Kimber situates the flat sides between the chambers so that where the cylinder needs the steel to withstand magnum pressure, it has it. The rest is milled away, making it a mere suggestion when concealed.

This combination does change the fulcrum of the K6s compared to similar revolvers I’ve shot, but not drastically so. The center of gravity is before the trigger, as opposed to behind. This actually balances it better in your hand—while leaving enough material forward to prevent it from becoming a beast when shooting hot loads.

In Control

With a self-defense pedigree, Kimber aimed at intuitiveness with the K6s from the start and carries it over to the Target. Its push-button cylinder release is especially welcome, making reloads fast when the situation calls for it. However, the gun doesn’t boast a full-length ejector rod. This is a point of contention for some (I personally prefer one), but perhaps a minor one, given that most emergency reloads involve tilting the rear of the cylinder groundward. Gravity helps make up the deficit.

The hammer spur is high—fractions of an inch below the rear sight when down. This is, I’m sure, a function of the gun evolving from a “carry” concept. Yet, it’s still within reach to cock the Target into single-action mode quickly with either thumb. It also has plenty of real estate to apply leverage. Additionally, Kimber includes a very positive conical pattern on the spur, which, with even minimal thumb flesh, is aggressive enough to ensure cocking.

A fully adjustable target rear sight allows the shooter to dial in the K6s. However, dovetailed in and a gutter at Target’s frame means the gun is compatible with Kimber’s low-rise combat sights.
A fully adjustable target rear sight allows the shooter to dial in the K6s. However, dovetailed in and a gutter at Target’s frame means the gun is compatible with Kimber’s low-rise combat sights.

The reward for doing so is an exceptional single-action trigger—which might be the highlight of the whole K6s setup. Kimber has won kudos far and wide for its early revolvers’ double-action trigger pull. I’ll attest to that as a result of my time with the Target and snubbie K6s models, it’s excellent. Yes, it’s long and heavy (around 10 pounds), but it’s also smooth as silk and stageable if you so desire.

As nice as it is, it pales to the revolver’s single action. Tripping at the low end of 3 pounds, it’s the nearest thing to a hair trigger you