Chicago Mayor Daley: He is protected by guns, but you can't be.
Chicago Mayor Daley: He is protected by guns, but you can’t be.

CHICAGO – A couple worries that burglars who tried to break in when the wife was home alone will return. A retiree fears the drug dealers and junkies just outside his window will attempt — again — to steal what he spent a lifetime earning. And a businessman wants to protect himself as he could when he was a police officer.

Together, they are the face of the most serious challenge yet to Chicago’s 28-year-old handgun ban.

On Tuesday, the four will take their seats inside the U.S. Supreme Court as their attorneys argue a lawsuit that bears their names: David and Colleen Lawson, Otis McDonald and Adam Orlov.

The four plaintiffs are not stereotypical gun rights advocates. They don’t represent the agenda of any national group or organize rallies. Instead they represent average Chicagoans — the kind of people that opponents of the city’s ban say should be allowed to protect themselves from gun violence.

“Some people want to stereotype advocates in any case, to make them look like a bunch of crazies,” said Alan Gura, a Virginia attorney who will argue the case. “But these are plaintiffs who reflect the city in which they live.”

Chicago’s ban on the sale and possession of handguns has been weathering legal challenges for years. But it gained newfound attention after the Supreme Court in 2008 struck down a similar handgun ban in the District of Columbia. The court now plans to decide whether the ruling on D.C., a city with unique federal status, should apply to local and state laws, too. Read more

Source: news.yahoo.com

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